Using The Template part 1

Contents

Filling Out The Lesson Outline

We have provided a template to help you quickly create your lesson outline. Entering information into this template is easy.

View a completed example of the lesson outline.

When you first see the template for entering your lesson plan, it looks like this:

{{Class|
topics1=|
gradelevel=|
context1=|
overview=|
learningobjectives=|
procedure=|
assignment=|}}

To enter things in the template, you just need to type in your text between the '=' and the '|'.

1. Topics

The first thing you need to do is describe which topics are going to be covered in your lesson. These topics will be used to help other people find your lesson outline, so be descriptive. There is no limit on the number of topics you include. We would recommend that you include one of the broad subjects listed on our Examples Bank page, so that your lesson is listed in one (or more) of those lists.

For each topic you want to include in your list of topics, you need to add a new line to the default text. For example, if my lesson was on eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic cells, the topics could be "Biology", "Cells", "Eukaryotic," "Prokaryotic," and "Science." My page would then look like this:

{{Class|
topics1=Biology|
topics2=Cells|
topics3=Eukaryotic|
topics4=Prokaryotic|
topics5=Science|
gradelevel=|
context1=|
overview=|
learningobjectives=|
procedure=|
assignment=|}}

Notice that each line that starts with "topics" has a different number following it. That is important. Every topic needs its own line, with a unique number following "topic." When you are trying to determine your topics, just think about what someone else could be teaching and in that context could benefit from your experiences. This is also where you might include skills and techniques, such as creativity, curiosity, problem-solving, and brainstorming.

The "strategy" tag

In addition to sharing actual formative assessment questions used with InkSurvey, sometimes the important aspect you may want to share may be a different strategy or technique for using InkSurvey. In these cases, please add the topic "strategy" to your other tags.

2. Grade Level

Then for grade level, please choose one of the following:

  • K-6
  • Middle School
  • High School
  • University
  • Other (please list "mixed levels," "corporate training," etc.)

Although your lesson plan may be useful to teachers in all levels, please choose the level where you actually used it. Using the previous example, the lesson came from a community college course, so that is what I'll put ("University"), even though teachers of much younger students might also be teaching this concept. My outline would look like this:

{{Class|
topics1=Biology|
topics2=Cells|
topics3=Eukaryotic|
topics4=Prokaryotic|
topics5=Science|
gradelevel=University|
context1=|
overview=|
learningobjectives=|
procedure=|
assignment=|}}

3. Context

In this area, please list as many of these contexts or environments as are appropriate for the educational experience you describe: "in classroom," "homework," "online," "informal education," "content delivery," "content review," and/or "skill development." As with topics, please put one entry per line, and including an increasing number after "context" on each line.

The example we are following was used in a regular classroom for delivery of content.

{{Class|
topics1=Biology|
topics2=Cells|
topics3=Eukaryotic|
topics4=Prokaryotic|
topics5=Science|
gradelevel=University|
context1=in classroom|
context2=content delivery|
overview=|
learningobjectives=|
procedure=|
assignment=|}}

4. Overview

For this, enter an overview of your lesson, so that others can understand the context of where it fits in the curriculum. For the example we are following, this is, "This lesson is at the beginning of a unit on cells and prepares students for a subsequent laboratory exercise designed to help them differentiate cells." The lesson plan now looks like:

{{Class|
topics1=Biology|
topics2=Cells|
topics3=Eukaryotic|
topics4=Prokaryotic|
topics5=Science|
gradelevel=University|
context1=in classroom|
context2=content delivery|
overview=This lesson is at the beginning of a unit on cells and prepares students for a subsequent laboratory exercise designed to help them differentiate cells.|
learningobjectives=|
procedure=|
assignment=|}}

5. Learning Objectives

Next, please enter your learning objective(s) for this particular lesson plan. Here is what the edited page would look like:

{{Class|
topics1=Biology|
topics2=Cells|
topics3=Eukaryotic|
topics4=Prokaryotic|
topics5=Science|
gradelevel=University|
context1=in classroom|
context2=content delivery|
overview=This lesson is at the beginning of a unit on cells and prepares students for a subsequent laboratory exercise designed to help them differentiate cells.|
learningobjectives=To be able to compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells|
procedure=|
assignment=|}}

6. Activity/Procedure

This is where you will describe the actual sequence of events in the learning experience. Please put in bold the formative assessment questions you will ask, embedded in the appropriate place as you describe your procedure. To make text bold, highlight it and then click on the far left button above the editing box, marked with a B. With the addition of these details, here is what our example lesson plan looks like:

{{Class|
topics1=Biology|
topics2=Cells|
topics3=Eukaryotic|
topics4=Prokaryotic|
topics5=Science|
gradelevel=University|
context1=in classroom|
context2=content delivery|
overview=This lesson is at the beginning of a unit on cells and prepares students for a subsequent laboratory exercise designed to help them differentiate cells.|
learningobjectives=To be able to compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells|
procedure= 1. Students are shown electron micrographs of 2 cells: one prokaryotic and one eukaryotic. They are asked to look for similarities and differences.
2. InkSurvey Question: Make a Venn diagram to show the similarities and differences you observed between these 2 cells.
3. Summarize for the class some of the observations reported in InkSurvey
4. Lecture on roots of words; lecture on fundamental differences between these 2 groups, using same 2 cells for illustration.
5. Show additional micrographs of cells and discuss how they illustrate prokaryotic vs. eukaryotic
6. Repeat the same InkSurvey Question: Make a Venn diagram to show the similarities and differences you observed between these 2 cells.
7. Use the "sort" feature to select some student responses to project for class discussion to further refine student understanding and correct misconceptions. Emphasize what is important to a biologist.|

assignment=|}}

7.Follow-up Assignment or Activity

In this section, please describe any follow-up activities or assignments you plan for reinforcing the learning. For now, our lesson plan is complete and ready to share. The editing page looks like this:

{{Class|
topics1=Biology|
topics2=Cells|
topics3=Eukaryotic|
topics4=Prokaryotic|
topics5=Science|
gradelevel=University|
context1=in classroom|
context2=content delivery|
overview=This lesson is at the beginning of a unit on cells and prepares students for a subsequent laboratory exercise designed to help them differentiate cells.|
learningobjectives=To be able to compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells|
procedure= 1. Students are shown electron micrographs of 2 cells: one prokaryotic and one eukaryotic. They are asked to look for similarities and differences.
2. InkSurvey Question: Make a Venn diagram to show the similarities and differences you observed between these 2 cells.
3. Summarize for the class some of the observations reported in InkSurvey
4. Lecture on roots of words; lecture on fundamental differences between these 2 groups, using same 2 cells for illustration.
5. Show additional micrographs of cells and discuss how they illustrate prokaryotic vs. eukaryotic
6. Repeat the same InkSurvey Question: Make a Venn diagram to show the similarities and differences you observed between these 2 cells.
7. Use the "sort" feature to select some student responses to project for class discussion to further refine student understanding and correct misconceptions. Emphasize what is important to a biologist.|
assignment=Students immediately perform a laboratory exercise using light microscopes to observe the similarities and differences between these cell types.|}}